Tuesday, 25 November 2014

Arts Borneo Show Case

Bidayuh


[source: http://www.perkim.net.my]

The name “Bidayuh” stand for residents of land. Bidayuh originally found in western part of Borneo. The collective name Land Dayaks were first used during the period of Rajah James Brooke. The Bidayuhs are a kind and mild mannered people who found mostly in the first division of Sarawak.


They are well-known for their
vibrant bamboo carvings, kesah mats and decorated vests which made from tree bark. At first, the hollow bamboo stems are dried. Then, a design is carved on the outside and shaped into coin holder, pen holders, and other practical items. They are also capable of create a magnificently decorated bamboo flute that composes a lingering melody.


In order to make the bark fabric, a suitable tree is stripped off in sheets and beaten with a wooden mallet until it is malleable and thin enough. After that, an artistic design is applied to give strength and prevent it from tearing lengthwise.


Moreover, the Bidayuhs weave split rattan stems to make plaited baskets and
colourful mats. The rattan is stained before use in order to get a multicolored pattern. Besides rattan, wild pandan and bemban are also used for mats.


All kind of goods have to be carried in baskets, such as firewood, or bamboo water pipes. Smaller size baskets are for holding seeds or offerings during their famous harvesting festivals known as Gawai which is also celebrated by all the other natives of Sarawak.

The Bidayuhs are well-known for their kesah mats which are made from rattan and beaten tree bark. These both materials are woven together to produce a hardy floor covering with a unique texture. Besides, kesah mats are used to dry their crops such as paddy and cocoa.

 

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